Friday, March 8, 2013

Shooting Stills & Video @ the Same Time: 9Shooter Bracket for Mounting and Connecting any Two Cameras / Camcorders / DSLRS / HD Hero GOPROs for Shooting Simultaneous Stills & Video

Shooting Stills & Video @ the Same Time: 9Shooter Bracket for Mounting and Connecting any Two Cameras / Camcorders / DSLRS / HD Hero GOPROs for Shooting Simultaneous Stills & Video

How Will You Shoot Quality Stills and Video at the Same Time?
Words and Photos by Dr. Elliot McGucken
Just as the world’s greatest surfer, Kelly Slater, reinvented himself by mastering aerials, today’s visual artists must remain competitive by keeping themselves atop the latest technological waves. And today’s dawn patrol is reporting that the waves are ideal for gnarly acrobatics once thought impossible: shooting high-quality stills and video simultaneously.
Two-page Red EPIC advertisements in photography publications and major glossies recently read, “Shoot a feature and the poster for it at the same time,” while stills pulled from 4K and 5K Red video footage regularly grace the covers of high-end magazines. Award-winning New York Times photographer Doug Mills mounted one DSLR atop another, calling his novel apparatus the “Double-Shot.” USA Today sports photographer Robert Hanashiro mounts an HD GoPro camera on a lens hood to capture video while shooting stills, writing on his site, “Obviously the best way to shoot a video gig is dedicating yourself to shooting just video. But in the ‘real world’ of newspaper photographers we’re having to multitask more and more.” NikonUSA.com presents various strategies for capturing HD-sized stills on a page appropriately titled, “What to do When you Need Stills while Shooting HD Video.”
Press the shutter button while shooting video on a typical DSLR, and some will halt the video to record a full-resolution still (albeit at less-than-optimum rates), while others will record both video and a smallish 2-mp, HD-sized still at the same time. You’ve likely seen, thought about, or even tried other strategies for capturing simultaneous stills and video. For the past three years I have been “45surfing”—shooting simultaneous full-size RAW stills while surfing 1080 HD video with either a dedicated video camera bracketed to a Nikon D4 and 600mm F4 Prime lens in a tripod-mounted configuration for pro surfing events, or a handheld rig consisting of a camcorder bracketed to a Nikon D800E and 70-200mm VR2 lens when shooting swimsuit models. Here’s a rundown of the philosophy and various approaches.
Surfing Moore’s Law: Waste the Abundant and Conserve The Precious and Rare.
The fundamental philosophy driving the simultaneous capture of stills and video is driven by Moore's Law—the same principle governing the exponential advancement of the Internet and digital media technologies which have afforded us inexpensive cameras alongside free and immediate global distribution. As the power of cameras and computers augments while their prices decline, so too does the power of storage media—hard drives and memory cards—plummet as their power increases. Feature films and TV shows are being shot on $2,000 cameras, while footage from the $200 GoPro HD Hero is being used in major movies and Madison Avenue advertisements alike. Run the numbers, and with time as scarce as ever and the importance of video in a world where YouTube is the second-largest search engine, it makes sense to set up one or several HD cameras for a shoot, mounting one on the stills-dedicated DSLR for the unique “first-person-shooter” perspective. “Shoot it all first,” as it costs the same, and “edit it down later” suggest a new philosophy for visual artists. And as weddings, sunset swimsuit shoots, and sporting events happen but once, you cannot return to shoot the video. You can’t ask the bride to walk down the aisle again, or ask Kelly Slater to re-land an aerial off a wave that is now gone forever. All of this calls us to adventure—to develop a strategy for capturing stills and video at the same time.
Stills and Video Require Different Approaches, Shutter Speeds, Etc.
A salient fact that one must honor while capturing simultaneous stills and video is that the two mediums generally require different shutter speeds for optimum quality. This is especially important when motion is present—either at the camera’s end, such as with a handheld rig, or when the subject is moving. When I was shooting Kelly Slater’s journey to victory at the Hurley Pro, exposure times for the Nikon D4 stills were generally between 1/2000s to 1/5000s, thereby freezing his action in mid-air, while the exposure for the video was around 1/60s to 1/120s—well over a magnitude of order difference!
A touch of motion blur in video frames is more pleasing to the eye, while sharpness is generally sought in photographic stills. For this reason, the Red cameras are limited, even with their 4K and 5K image sizes. If you optimizes the shutter speed for sharpness with speeds of 1/2000s or just 1/1000s, the video will appear “stuttery,” like those old black and white WWII film clips. Should you optimize the shutter speed for video at around 1/60s to 1/120s, motion blur will creep into the stills, showing up in handheld shots or when the subject is moving. When photographer Kevin Arnold used a $65,000 Red EPIC rig (now around $40,000) to shoot skiers at Whistler Mountain, he concluded, “The EPIC’s sensor, while amazing for video, just isn’t on par with top-end DSLRs and certainly not even close to medium format digital cameras when it comes to still images. The bigger challenge—especially when shooting fast moving lifestyle or sports action—is achieving fast shutter speeds. The great majority of the frames we shot were soft due to either camera movement or subject motion blur. This is the single biggest issue with pulling stills from video.”
Red EPIC vs. Hasselblad with Headshot Master Peter Hurley.
In the Fstoppers’ piece Will Video Cameras Kill Still Photography? Red EPIC vs. Hasselblad,” Peter Hurley shot headshots with both a Red and an older Hasselblad. It was generally agreed that while the Epic was impressive, the Hasselblad produced better results. But when one factors in the costs of the ~ $40,000 Red system vs. the ~ $10,000 Hasselblad, pulling stills from even the best 5K video leaves much to be desired for portraitists. Peter utilized continuous lighting for his test, and while a Red can be used with strobes, there are far more tried-and-true flash options for standard DSLR and medium format cameras. However, needless to say, if one also wants 5K video of the shoot, the Red wins
The New York Times’ Doug Mills’ “Double-Shot.”
While Doug’s method of mounting one DSLR in the hot shoe of another generated some buzz in the summer of 2011, it seems that he has not been employing the method as of late. Drawbacks include the occupied flash shoe, the lack of video stabilization, and the fact that two DSLRS can feel quite heavy after a short while. As he was using Canons, both cameras would had to have been manually focused when following a subject, which could lead to missed shots, while being awkward and unwieldy at best.
My lighter-than-a-DSLR, high-quality Panasonic or Canon camcorders I attach underneath my DSLR come with amazing video stabilization—a feature also lacking on Doug’s setup. The Sony A65 and A77 DSLRs, which I also use, come with both image-stabilization and auto-tracking focus which follows and focuses on moving objects, separating them from the background. I have experimented with mounting a video-dedicated Sony A77 underneath a Nikon D800E, and while it’s heavier than the camcorders and the image stabilization isn’t quite as good, it is capable of a shallower depth-of-field, for that coveted cinematic look and feel.
Capturing Video with the HD GoPro while Shooting Stills.
USA Today sports photographer Robert Hanashiro writes on sportsshooter.com, his blog, “I have a GoPro mount stuck onto the end of a lens hood for my Nikkor 24-70mm, and if you’re a ‘one-man band’ like I am, shooting assignments for stills and video, this can sometimes be a nice solution.” On YouTube, you can find photographers wearing the GoPRo during shoots, but with its fixed wide-angle lens, the lens of the stills camera is often present in the shot. Additionally, subjects appear a bit further away than you might like, and suffer some wide-angle distortion when they are close. The camcorders I use offer simple zoom controls, suited to shooting pro surfers a hundred yards offshore with a 23x stabilized zoom, or a model fifteen feet in front of me.

Tomorrow’s Cameras Will All Record Stills and Video Simultaneously.

The iPhone 5 can take full-resolution (8 mp) jpgs while shooting video, as can some compact cameras such as the Nikon 1 V2 (14 mp).  However, the capture rate of stills is relatively slow, and RAW stills yet elude the photographer in video mode on such devices.  Both the small-sensor iPhone and comparable Android smartphones lack zooms and that coveted shallow-depth-of-field film look.

DSLRs such as the Canon 7D can acquire full-sized RAW photos while shooting video, but the video is interrupted. And on other DSLRs, when they do not interrupt the video, the photos are limited to the HD frame’s 2mp size, falling far short of their 22-36mp full-frame capabilities. Needless to say, we do not pay top-dollar to purchase 36mp DSLRs to end up with puny 2mp jpg stills captured in video mode. 
Soon the processing power to shoot both full-sized RAW stills and RAW video will arrive across the board, as it exists today in the Red systems. In a couple years, 4K video, which is about 4 times the size of HD video (more than enough for feature films at your local multiplex), will replace HD as the standard, and even our smartphones will be shooting 4K video. But as aforementioned, while stills pulled from a 4K video will be large enough for print magazines and billboards, their exposure times will not always be optimum, especially in hand-held scenarios or when shooting motion. If you increase the shutter speed for sharper images, the video will suffer. Thus two cameras—one dedicated to stills and one to video—will continue to have advantages, as optimum stills and video generally require different exposure times. Also, this allows you to capture different fields of view in the stills and video, with different depths of fields, and, as we have seen, different shutter speeds; all of which suggests the use of a dual-camera system.
Some Advantages of the 45Surfer System.
I constructed a table comparing the 45surfer to the Red EPIC, Hanashiro’s HD GoPro, general DSLRS, iPhones/Droids/smartphones, and other approaches. By no means is this list complete, nor is it the final word, and we would love to hear about your innovative takes on capturing stills and video at the same time, and the reasons for your preferred methods and means.
Note to designer: INSERT TABLE HERE
Sooner than later, a manufacturer will release a small, light, mirror-less compact camera system, such as the Sony NEX-7, with high-quality image-stabilization, tracking auto-focus, and the coveted shallow depth-of-field. Bracket two of these cameras together—one for stills and one for video—and the rig will weigh less than a single typical DSLR and lens. I am currently working on an app, which will be capable of matching the two cameras’ settings, such fields of view, zoom, and other selected attributes, so that when you zoom in with the stills-dedicated camera with a shutter optimized for stills, the video-dedicated camera follows suit, zooming with its shutter optimized for video, while correcting for parallax.
Just as once-impossible aerials are now part of all the world’s leading surfers’ standard repertoires, what was once inconceivable—shooting quality stills and video at the same time—is becoming a standard part of the modern visual artists’ repertoire. And remember that in the arts, as in business and life, the classic surfing maxim holds true: “The surfer having the most fun wins!”
About the Author: Dr. Elliot McGucken studied physics at Princeton University and UNC Chapel Hill. His award-winning physics Ph.D. dissertation on an artificial retina for the blind and enhanced CMOS photosensors, which was funded by the NSF and which appeared in Popular Science and numerous scientific publications, is now affording the blind sight. As a SoCal surfer and photographer/videographer, Dr. McGucken continues to work with CMOS photosensors in his Nikons as his 45Surf “Hero’s Journey Mythology” photography collection has grown to attract over 75 million views on Flickr and SmugMug, while he researches new techniques for shooting stills and video at the same time.
Shooting Stills & Video @ the Same Time: 9Shooter Bracket for Mounting and Connecting any Two Cameras / Camcorders / DSLRS / HD Hero GOPROs for Shooting Simultaneous Stills & Video
 

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Sunday, August 19, 2012

Pro Surfers in Huntington Beach Shot with the Nikon D4 + 600 mm F4 Nikkor Prime & Panasonic X900MK 45WINDSURFER! Shooting Stills & Video Simultaneously!


Pro Surfers in Huntington Beach Shot with the Nikon D4 + 600 mm F4 Nikkor Prime & Panasonic X900MK 45WINDSURFER!  Shooting Stills & Video Simultaneously!
Nikon D4 rig with Video Camera for Shooting Stills & Video @ Same Time!

Nikon D4 Shooting Stills & Video @ Same Time! Pro Surf Girl Lakey Peterson Wins Nike US Open @ Huntington Beach Pier! from Hero's Journey Mythology Code of on Vimeo.

Nikon D4 Photos of Pro Surf Girl Lakey Peterson's  19.76 Record Heat!
Nikon D4 with AF-S Nikkor 600mm f/4G ED VR & Video Camera @ Huntington Beach!
Goddess Shooting Stills & Video @ the Same Time with a Nikon D800E & Camcorder Nikon D4 rig with Video Camera for Shooting Stills & Video @ Same Time!
The Nikon D4 + 600 mm F4 Nikkor Prime & Panasonic X900MK 45WINDSURFERTM!

I used the above Nikon D4 + 600 mm F4 Prime & the Panasonic X900MK 3MOS 3D Full HD SD Camcorder to shoot stills and video at the same time at the Nike US Open surf contest at Huntington Beach--Surf City, USA!   Next year I look forward to using a 4K or 5K video camera in the above 45WindSurfer / 9shooter configuration.  The great thing about the 45WindSurfer is that it will forever surf Moore's Law, allowing the photographer/videographer (the 45WindSurfer) to captialize on the best available video and stills capturing technologies, marrying them together in an unprecedented manner.


Nikon D4 Photos of Pro Surf Girl Lakey Peterson's  19.76 Record Heat! Nikon D4 Photos of Pro Surf Girl Lakey Peterson's  19.76 Record Heat! Stills from the Nikon D4 + 600 mm F4 Nikkor Prime & Panasonic X900MK 45WINDSURFERTM!


I shot stills & video of pretty much the whole week-long contest, so it will take awhile to edit all the footage. This post focuses mostly on the stills and video of Lakey Peterson's record-setting heat at the pro women's Nike Hurley US Open Surfing contest in Huntington Beach, along with some footage of reigning 11-time champ Kelly Slater (Ke11y Sl8r).
Nikon D4 & 600 mm F4 Nikkor photos of KE11Y SL8R! Kelly Slater! Nikon D4 & 600 mm F4 Nikkor photos of KE11Y SL8R! Kelly Slater!
Stills from the Nikon D4 + 600 mm F4 Nikkor Prime & Panasonic X900MK 45WINDSURFERTM!

Here's some more of the video I shot with the above 45WINDSURF / 9SHOOTER rig:

I purposely did not add a soundtrack, so you can hear the Nikon D4 firing away (as well as the crowd cheering!)  Be sure to watch the above videos in full HD!

And here're the Nikon D4 photos of Lakey Peterson:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/herosjourneymythology45surf/sets/72157630893312602/with/7708478822/">www.flickr.com/photos/herosjourneymythology45surf/sets/72...</a>

Enjoy!

Nikon D4 with AF-S Nikkor 600mm f/4G ED VR & Video Camera @ Huntington Beach!
Shooting some video and photographic stills of surfers at the Nike US Open at Huntingon Beach!

I call the above DSLR+camcorder combination the 45WINDSURFER as it lets you SURF the intermittent waves of stills photography, while catching the constant WIND of video. :)  I shoot all my models with a variation of this setup too, using the D800 instead with the 70-200 mm VR2, which you can see pictured belowand in the right sidebar.

Here is my gear for the Nike US Open as well as for the Hurley Pro Surfing event in Trestles next month:

Nikon D4 with AF-S NIKKOR 600mm f/4G ED VR & Video Camera!

The AF-S NIKKOR 600mm f/4G ED VR is a high-speed, high-performance prime lens which features Nikon’s VR image stabilization and Nano Crystal Coat!

The Nikon D4 rocks!  It focuses fast and continuously!  It can shoot 11 RAWS/second!  Ideal for shooting Kelly Slater/Lakey Peterson cutting, carving, and catching air.

The video camera is the amazing image-stabilized Panasonic X900MK 3MOS 3D Full HD SD Camcorder.  The 3MOS Sensor splits the light information captured by the lens into the three primary colors - red, green and blue - and processes each color with its own individual sensor. This reduces light loss compared to the 1MOS sensor. Pixel Shift Technology, which took years to develop, provides a huge number of effective pixels for moving pictures – equivalent to four times the pixel count of Full-HD. This technology renders ultrafine images with excellent color reproduction and superb detail!  It is built with an awesome F1.5 LEICA lens!  The image stabilization is amazing on this, even at full zoom!

Using a rugged Manfrotto tripod and a Manfrotto Bogen tripod head! Next time I may use a fluid video head, though due to the great mass of the Nikon D4 + 600 mm F4 Prime + camcorder, the Bogen tripod head operates extremely smoothly!

Wish me luck @ the finals! :)  Wish you could join me to shoot stills & video of the world's greatest surfers!

The pictures of the gear were shot with the awesome 24 MP Sony Alpha 65 (A65).

The panasonic camcorder shoots at 60P, and I slow it down to 24P in post for slow motion!  Some of the Sony camcorders shoot at 60P too, and I think Canon is releasing a 60P camcorder soon.  Let me know what camcorders you would use!  I look forward to using a 4K camcorder sometime next year. :)

Goddess Shooting Stills & Video @ the Same Time with a Nikon D800E & Camcorder
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Thursday, May 17, 2012

The Second Annual "Stills & Video Pro Surfing Showdown!" 9SHOOTER Canon / Nikon / Sony vs RED EPIC / RED SCARLET photographic stills & video showdown challenge!

Time to assess the best methods for shooting stills & video @ the same time that win not just amongst the forum fanboyz, but in real life!  Join us at The Second Annual "Simultaneous Stills & Video Pro Surfing Showdown!" 9SHOOTER Canon / Nikon / Sony vs RED EPIC / RED SCARLET photographic stills & video showdown challenge!  Bring all your ideas, concepts, and rigs!


The 9SHOOTER at the 2011 Hurley Pro in San Clemente @ Trestles Beach. Again no RED EPIC in sight. Perhaps they'll show up for the showdown this year? Speaking of showdowns, two quotes from my favorite Clint Eastwood film come to mind: "A man's gotta know his limitations," and, "When the man with a 45 meets the man with a rifle, you said the man with a pistol is a dead man. Let's see if it's true." -The Man With No Name in Fistful of Dollars :)
  Bikini Swimsuit Model Goddess
The 9SHOOTERTM hereby challenges the RED EPIC / SCARLET community to see who can capture the best video and stills at a pro surfing event in Southern California. We can meet up at either the 2012 Hurley Pro in San Clemente in September or the 2012 Nike US Open in Huntington Beach in July. Hopefully EPIC will do better than last year, when they didn't even show. (http://blog.9shooter.com/2011/08/9shooter-beats-out-surfs-red-epic-at.html)

The basic rules will be as follows:

1) One-on-one. The 9shooter operator and RED operator (preferably Jim Jannard) must carry all their equipment onto the beach by themselves and operate it by themselves.
2) All photographs and video must be finished by the operator.
3) Points will be given for stills, video, and overall cost of equipment including batteries/memory cards/lenses/etc. (the exact breakdown & criterion/weighting will be discussed--feel free to comment with suggestions!)

Regarding shooting stills & video at the same time with the 9shooter, Philip Bloom tweeted, "this is for real...it did make me chuckle! http://blog.9shooter.com/2011/06/canon-based-nine-shooter-9shooter-4500.html"

As these are 4-7+ day events with some 10-12 hour days of surfing, from sunup to sundown, the equipment will have to be quite durable in the hot sun!  Quite a few memory cards/SSD drives will be needed, and all this will be factored into the total cost! 

Well, I would love to challenge Philip (or any RED operator) to a showdown consisting of shooting stills & video at a surfing championship in California this summer!  I'll be shooting with a Canon D1X or Nikon D4, with a camcorder (with image stabilization superior to the RED's) attached to the 9shooter system. You can see some basic pictures of the 9shooter setup here:

I may elect to use the new Sony NEX-FS700U which will cost under $10,000 (B&H has it for $7,999), while offering 4K video as well and super slow-mo! CNET reports:
The camera can shoot slow-motion video at 5X and 10X speeds at 1080p resolution with 120fps and 240fps modes and 20X and 40X speeds at lower resolution with 480fps and 960fps modes, Sony said ahead of the National Association of Broadcasters conference that begins April 14.
Even if I shoot with the new SONY with an awesome Zeiss zoom lens and the Nikon D4 with an awesome Nikkor zoom, the setup with memory cards and batteries will still be about 1/4 the cost of the RED EPIC setup, while allowing for superior stills and video, and also being smaller, lighter, and nimbler. The 9SHOOTER also offers greater redundancy with two cameras, one of which has dual card slots. All in all, it ought make Philip Bloom not only chuckle, but roll around on the beach, roaring with laughter!





Or, I could go with the $15,000 Canon EOS-1D C or $30,000 C500 4K Cinema camera, and still fly in way under the cost of the RED EPIC setup, even while adding a Nikon D4 or Canon DX1 to the 9SHOOTER system. 





Doug Mills of the NYT should feel free to join us too with his two camera setup!



So come on out with your RED EPICs for the showdown in 2012! Feel free to email me @ drelliot@gmail.com!



Video & stills shot @ same time with 9shooter beats NYT's method.
Check out some videos & stills of Kelly Slater shot with the 9shooter.


Model modeling 9shooter & shot with 9shooter. (Video & stills shot @ same time with 9shooter beats NYT's method.)




10-time world surfing champ Kelly Slater shot with 9shooter in S-mount configuration.
Read the 9shooter video & stills/Kelly Slater story here!


The RED EPIC used by Kevin Arnold cost $65,000 and took a crew of three people to operate, and the stills still weren't as good as those from a Nikon D800/D4 or Canon 5D Mark III/D1X.   For shooting action shots of skiers, you're going to want to look at shutter speeds approaching 1/1000 of a second, which the RED EPIC doesn't get close to while being used for shooting quality video.



I could go the all-Sony route with the 9SHOOTER, using a Sony A77 for stills (taking advantage of the mirrorless 12 fps!) in conjunction with a Sony NEX-FS100 for video.  Or I could use a Nikon D4 for stills while using the  Sony NEX-FS100 for video, or the Panasonic HDC-TM900K 3D Camcorder with 32GB Internal Flash Memory, which I am currently using for video.  It's an awesome camera with a large Leica lens!  No matter which way I go, the price of the 9shooter setup will be less than 1/4 the price of the RED EPIC setup, and it may even be as low as 1/8th the cost!  How's that for saving $50,000+ while getting equal or better quality video and stills, while also carrying more redundancy into the shoot!









Nikon D800 Photos of Swimsuit Bikini Model Goddess in Malibu Sea Cave
                                    Photographic still pulled from a 9SHOOTER.


THE RED EPIC'S ACHILLES' HEEL (OR ACHILLES' HEELS):



In addition to its far greater cost, lack of image stabilization, more primitive AF,  cornucopia of hidden costs, bugginess/unreliability, heavier weight, and general unwieldiness of the RED EPIC when compared to the 9SHOOTER system, it also has another glaring shortcoming.  A major bottleneck and limiting factor in the RED EPIC's simultaneous capture of photographic stills and video is that stills and video oft must be shot with different shutter speeds for optimum quality.  For instance, in shooting atheletic events such as football, soccer, surfing, or tennis, or NASCAR, or artistic events such as ballet or figure-skating, shutter speeds are oft kept around 1/1000 s.  On the other hand, video usually utilizes shutter speeds closer to 1/60 s or 1/120 s--about a factor of ten difference, or, as we say in physics, an order of magnitude difference!  Although the RED EPIC is said to have shutter speeds as fast as 1/2000 s, does anyone use such fast shutter speeds to shoot high-quality video for film or TV?  Nobody that we've heard of!  


As Kevin Arnold states at aphotoeditor:
The bigger challenge – especially when shooting fast moving lifestyle or sports action – is achieving fast shutter speeds. The great majority of the frames we shot were soft due to either camera movement, or subject motion blur. This is the single biggest issue with pulling stills from video. The fact is that video looks best when shot with a shutter angle of 180 degrees, or double the frame rate. Shooting at 120 frames per second, means you’re really limited to about 1/250 of a second– not nearly fast enough to achieve 100 percent sharpness on every frame. In theory, you can crank up the shutter speed on the EPIC to freeze motion, but the video will suffer as a result. Moreover, motion blur is actually what makes video look smooth and pleasing to watch.
One way around this for the RED EPIC would be to use two cameras--one RED EPIC for stills with a fast shutter speed, and a second RED EPIC for video with a slower shutter speed.  I'd be happy to sell Jim Jannard a 9SHOOTER bracket so he could rock it! :)  But then one might need four RED EPICS (with two backups), as Philip Bloom writes:


  So why don’t I have it (the RED EPIC) anymore?Well it comes down to a number of things…numbers 1 and 3 being the major ones, 2 being the irritant…1: I was no longer comfortable with using the camera on paid jobs. I had the camera back but they could not find the fault, they did a full rebuild, but it would mean I would never know what the issues were and if they really had been fixed. I have never shot with a camera where I was so unsure of it to the point if I took it on a job would it work?I had some incredibly unhelpful remarks from people (not RED) saying it was my fault for going on a paid job with no second EPIC as a backup. I am sorry but I am not rich. I can only afford one (barely as I had planned to pay it off over the next year) and if I went to client explaining what that extra £1000 per day on my quote was for (an extra rented EPIC as mine was unreliable) that would simply not wash with them. --http://philipbloom.net/2011/12/10/nomoreepic/

Photos of the Nikon D800 in the field!


Here're the video and stills we caught with the < $3,500 9-shooter system (pictured below) consisting of a Canon T3i, a 150-500mm Sigma Zoom zoomed out at 500mm, a Panasonic HDC-TM900K zoomed out fully to 20x and shooting full-HD at 1080 60p, and a sturdy Manfroto monopod:
9shooter slow-mo video shot at full 1080 HD @ 60p:


9shooter stills--you can see the video shot alongside the below still towards the end of the video above: 

In the below picture courtesy of surf.transworld.net & Checkwood, you can see me standing on the shore, about the fifth from left, in my red surf shorts and black 45surf t-shirt, wielding a 9shooter. What you can't see is a Red Epic, and had there been one out there, would they have been able to maneuver it to the water's edge, to get it in front of the spectators when they stormed the beach for the final heats?

2011 Nike US Open Of Surfing Champion Kelly Slater. Photo: Checkwood





Our $3,500 9shooter system: a Canon T3i, a 150-500mm Sigma Zoom zoomed out at 500mm, a Panasonic HDC-TM900K zoomed out fully to 20x and shooting full-HD at 1080 60p, a sturdy Manfroto monopod, and plenty of 32 GIG SD cards & batteries:



Vincent Laforet & his RED EPIC rig, writing, "Some of you will ask:  "Is this a GAME CHANGER?"" http://blog.vincentlaforet.com/2011/06/07/what-camera-did-i-use-to-make-this-still-picture/#comment-34093(We didn't see one of these Red Epics by the Huntington Beach pier last week!) Vincent Laforet's above rig costs, in his words, "Right now the RED Epic is a $30,000+ camera that is far from accessible to most due to its price. ($58K with all of the accessories for the hand-machined "M" series – the factory made "X" series will be almost 1/3 cheaper.)."

Well, expect the 9shooter to become more and more powerful in the coming years, as Canon and Panasonic release 2k/3k/4k/5k camcorders and DSLRS, surfing Moore's Law on towards victory! Surf's up dudes! Join the fun in 9shooting the waves!























HD slow-mo video shot at the same time as stills via the 9shooter


RED will be eclipsed by Canon, just like Sun computers was eclipsed by PCs, as Moore's Law tends to favor companies aiming up, rather than companies aiming downwards.

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Thursday, August 11, 2011

9shooter Beats (out-surfs) Red Epic (& the Red Scarlet) in Shooting Video & Stills @ the Same Time @ the 2011 US Open in Surfing in Huntington Beach

Video & stills shot @ same time with 9shooter beats NYT's method.
Check out some videos & stills of Kelly Slater shot with the 9shooter.


Model modeling 9shooter & shot with 9shooter. (Video & stills shot @ same time with 9shooter beats NYT's method.)



10-time world surfing champ Kelly Slater shot with 9shooter in S-mount configuration.
Read the 9shooter video & stills/Kelly Slater story here!



Firstoff, I bet that Canon comes out with a 2K/3K/4K DSLR camera in a year or so, and a 5k in a couple years. :)



Well, we keep hearing about how the Red Epic can shoot "Getty Worthy" stills & video @ the same time, but Steve Weinrebe points out, "I don’t see the Epic listed on Getty Images’ approved camera list for contributors," whereas all the cameras that are listed are compatible with the 9shooter setup, including, "the Canon 5D, Canon EOS 1D Mk 1, 2 & 3, Canon EOS 1DS Mk 1, 2 & 3 Canon EOS 30 and 40D, Nikon D2X and D3 and the Nikon D200 & D300 and the Lecia M8." So if you really want to shoot Getty-worthy stills while shooting video dudes & dudettes, the 9shooter's the way to go!

9shooter slow-mo video of 10-time world champion Kelly Slater winning the 2011 US Open shot at full 1080 HD @ 60p at the same time I was shooting stills:


Kelly Slater completely dominated the final heat in capturing  the US Open of Surfing Title this past weekend, defeating Australian Yadin Nicol.   Sfgate.com reported on Slater's epic shutout:
"I guess Yadin (Nicol) wanted me to win because he didn't catch any waves," said Slater, referring to Nicol's meager point total of 2.57 from catching just one wave in the final. "I was just really frustrated for him because he was sitting out the back waiting for the big sets and the big sets were close outs. The small ones he was just two far outside and I got them. I think what happened is I got the 8.50 to start and he was just going to be patient. If he got a good one he would have thrown a big rotator, but it just never came."
Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/csaatsaz/detail?entry_id=94950#ixzz1UjgGilIq
Well, that's the exact same way we felt about the Red Epic--"I guess the Red Epic wanted the 9shooter to win because the Red Epic didn't take any pictures nor video of the event--the Red Epic didn't catch any waves."

Yes, folks. It seems the Red Epic just didn't show, and as hockey great Wayne Gretsky stated, "I missed every shot I never took." I looked up and down the beach, but I could see no Red Epic, and as huge and bulky as it is, it would have been hard to miss! And if the Red Epic had shown, imagine how much it would have cost to shoot the final three days the of the US Open--easily over 20x the cost of the 9shooter! Check out the Epic hidden cost of the Red Epic: http://www.theblackandblue.com/2011/08/04/epic-cost/. And still, it would have lacked the dynamic video stabilization which allowed me to catch the video below while zoomed out 20x from a monopod. I would love to see some 20x zoomed footage of the Red Epic from a monopod or tripod even, following a surfer who is shredding, carving, and catching big air and landing epic aerials, 360s, and rodeo flips--who is zigging, zagging, cutting, and jumping!  And then seemlessly panning to the next surfer catching the same wave when the first one wipes out.

Here're the video and stills we caught with the < $3,500 9-shooter system (pictured below) consisting of a Canon T3i, a 150-500mm Sigma Zoom zoomed out at 500mm, a Panasonic HDC-TM900K zoomed out fully to 20x and shooting full-HD at 1080 60p, and a sturdy Manfroto monopod:
9shooter slow-mo video shot at full 1080 HD @ 60p:


9shooter stills--you can see the video shot alongside the below still towards the end of the video above:

In the below picture courtesy of surf.transworld.net & Checkwood, you can see me standing on the shore, about the fifth from left, in my red surf shorts and black 45surf t-shirt, wielding a 9shooter. What you can't see is a Red Epic, and had there been one out there, would they have been able to maneuver it to the water's edge, to get it in front of the spectators when they stormed the beach for the final heats?

2011 Nike US Open Of Surfing Champion Kelly Slater. Photo: Checkwood





Our $3,500 9shooter system: a Canon T3i, a 150-500mm Sigma Zoom zoomed out at 500mm, a Panasonic HDC-TM900K zoomed out fully to 20x and shooting full-HD at 1080 60p, a sturdy Manfroto monopod, and plenty of 32 GIG SD cards & batteries:



Vincent Laforet & his RED EPIC rig, writing, "Some of you will ask:  "Is this a GAME CHANGER?"" http://blog.vincentlaforet.com/2011/06/07/what-camera-did-i-use-to-make-this-still-picture/#comment-34093(We didn't see one of these Red Epics by the Huntington Beach pier last week!) Vincent Laforet's above rig costs, in his words, "Right now the RED Epic is a $30,000+ camera that is far from accessible to most due to its price. ($58K with all of the accessories for the hand-machined "M" series – the factory made "X" series will be almost 1/3 cheaper.)."

Well, expect the 9shooter to become more and more powerful in the coming years, as Canon and Panasonic release 2k/3k/4k/5k camcorders and DSLRS, surfing Moore's Law on towards victory! Surf's up dudes! Join the fun in 9shooting the waves!

HD slow-mo video shot at the same time as stills via the 9shooter


RED will be eclipsed by Canon, just like Sun computers was eclipsed by PCs, as Moore's Law tends to favor companies aiming up, rather than companies aiming downwards.


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Friday, July 15, 2011

Top 10 reasons why the 9shooter bracket (Canon 5D Mark II DSLR + Camcorder/Video Camera) beats the NYT's Doug Mills' method for shooting photographic stills and video simultaneously.

Top 10 reasons why the 9shooter bracket (Canon 5D Mark II DSLR + Camcorder/Video Camera) beats the NYT's Doug Mills' method for shooting photographic stills and video simultaneously.
Video & stills shot @ same time with 9shooter beats NYT's method.
Check out some videos & stills of Kelly Slater shot with the 9shooter.


Model modeling 9shooter & shot with 9shooter. (Video & stills shot @ same time with 9shooter beats NYT's method.)


10-time world surfing champ Kelly Slater shot with 9shooter in S-mount configuration.
Read the 9shooter video & stills/Kelly Slater story here!

 
 Lisa B LisaBernstein 
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 thanks, will check it out -- Lisa B (Lisa Bernstein), singer-poet
 Chris Eldridge 
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 cool, I'd love to field test one of the brackets.
 Jessica @ Chirky.com 
Chirky Times is out!  ▸ Top stories today via  
 NDSmith 
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 thanks for the tip!
 Cascada News 

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 if you can make some for us! We'd love to credit you for them
 Taraneh Guidry 


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 BEcreative:SinceUcan 




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 nice rigs, thanks for the tip.






 NealAugenstein 




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 CL 








 Rich Leighton 



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 Henry's Camera 




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 Photojournalismlinks 




Join our twitter @ http://twitter.com/45surf !  Dude! Surf's up!  We're approaching Shopenhauer's third wave which will take us beyond the 2.5% early innovator's stage in the realm of shooting stills & video @ the same time!
"All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." -Shopenhauer on the truth & beauty of shooting stills & video at the same time! :)

"9shooting.  There is no stopping an idea whose time has come." --Victor Hugo

It's totally awesome to see the NYT shooting photographic stills and video at the same time, using a method we tried out a couple years back! In developing "9shooting" over the past few years in our high-tech, state-of-the-art research labs, we determined that when it comes to shooting stills and video simultaneously, the methods afforded by the 9shooter "Hero's Journey Mythology" bracket are far superior to the method recently used by Doug Mills of the New York Times, pictured below.  We tried Doug's ball-socket-hotshoe-mount back in January 2010 out on the beach, but found it lacking when compared to the 9shooter--please see our pictures of our Doug-like "video camera mounted above the DSLR" below.  Long story short,
  1. The 9shooter comes with the powerful dynamic image stabilization in the HD video, afforded by the hd camcorders
  2. The 9shooter bracket leaves plenty of room for one to easily mount a shotgun mic or a wireless receiver, thusly transferring the sound capture away from the "click-clicking" of the shutter. Please see a Sennheiser wireless receiver and a shotgun mic mounted in the 9shooter photos below.
  3. The 9shooter is more ergonomically comfortable/balanced.
  4. The 9shooter is more stable, as the center of mass is below the pivot point.  (Yes!  I have a Ph.D. in physics!)  It is better balanced relative to the gripping point on the stills camera, as the center of mass is below the gripping point, resulting in less torque on the wrist, and more short-term & long-term comfort/stability.
  5. The 9shooter is lighter, as the typical HD video camera or camcorder is far lighter than a DSLR.
  6. The 9shooter allows for easier monitoring of the HD video screen on the camcorder, as all one must do is glance down with their left eye.
  7. The 9shooter allows for easier relative adjustments of angles between the two cameras to be made by reaching below the stills camera and center of mass, instead of above it.
  8. The 9shooter saves the flash shoe from possible damage.
  9. The 9shooter leaves the flash shoe free, allowing a flash or LED light panel or other device to sit in the flash shoe, thusly providing invaluable flash/fill light (or sound/or a multitude of components on a 9shooter multimount mounted on the flash shoe).
  10. The 9shooter allows for far easier zooming on the video camera, as all one must do is reach down and hit the zoom lever which is located at the rear top of the camcorder. (instead of having to reach up above and out front to the lens of the DSLR, as one must in doug's configuration)
  11. The 9shooter allows for far more flexibility and countless configurations--a "tinker toys" of bracket customizability, reaching below and above cameras as needed (as seen below). 
  12. The 9shooter allows for the famous S-shaped configuration, used to catch surfing legend Kelly Slater in the 9shooter monopod configuration. 
Here is Doug Mills' setup for shooting stills & video @ the same time. (Double DSLR)


DESCRIPTION
Doug Mills/The New York Times
The top camera shoots video, the bottom shoots stills.

Here is the all-around better 9shooter setup (Canon 5D Mark II DSLR attached/bracketed to Camcorder/Video Camera), which will also come with a free 45SURF t-shirt:

(note the sennheiser wireless receiver which is easily mounted on the 9shooter bracket!)




THE 9SHOOTER!! :)  (Canon 5D Mark II DSLR attached/bracketed to Canon HFS200 Camcorder/Video Camera)
 9SHOOTER WITH VIDEO MIC!

THE 9SHOOTER!! :)


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 The 9shooter bracket is also quite flexible, allowing for countless configuratuions!

Note the microphone on the 9shooter bracket, thusly freeing up the flash shoe for the flash!


Join our twitter @ http://twitter.com/45surf !

Back in January 2010, we tried out configurations similar to Doug Mills', but we did not like them as much. Here're some pics:

swimsuit model hdvideo dslr stills simultaneous 45surf bikini 030,.kl,..,

swimsuit model hdvideo dslr stills simultaneous 45surf bikini 003.,kl,.

Well, long story short, it's cool to see the NYT adopting the idea of shooting stills & video at the same time!

We've been waiting for quite some time for the mainstream to adopt such an obvious and useful innovation such as the 9shooter technology & philosophy! Right now, we are at the 2.5% innovator's stage:

(Image courtesy of http://www.joycehostyn.com -- cool article!)

We're excited to surf the wave of shooting stills & video at the same time, and it's awesome to see The New York Times helping Shopenhauer along towards the inevitable! :)
"All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." -Shopenhauer on the truth & beauty of shooting stills & video at the same time! :)
When we first shared our novel, helpful, wealth-augmenting ideas for shooting stills & video @ the same time a couple years back,  we were somewhat surprised to see the useful ideas greeted not with appreciation, nor even indifference, so much as with vehement rancor, h8, and ill-will (which can still be seen today as forum fanboyz go lzozozzozl dat sux shoooting stillz & video same time stoopid idea lzozlzlzl bikinis yah yah lozzo omg bikinis lzolzl spammers!), thusly manifesting Shopenhauer's first two stages of "ridicule and violent opposition" in typical fanboy "expert" fashion.  The internet is brimming with the fanbaby antics of those who would rather argue canon vs. nikon/raw vs. jpeg than actually go out and shoot, surpassed only by the arrogance of the seasoned fanbaby "expert" with a twitter account who goes "zlozlzozzlo omg lzoozozl dontya know i own twitter get off it! lzozozl bikinis lzozllz."  By and by we realized that the forum fanbaby opposition to the concept of shootings stills & video at the same time was due to a number of things (as well as to the fact that not one of the critics had ever tried it!):
  1. The photography industry/profession is undergoing a dramatic shift (and identity crises), and many would argue decline, as a plethora of high-quality consumer-level gear is eroding various photography markets.  Of course top photographers will still do well, as Aunt Bessie with her iphone is no match for a $10,000 wedding photographer, but when you have 200 Aunt Bessies at the wedding, some with DSLRs, all uploading pics to facebook the next day, the $10,000 wedding photographer's business will be eroded.
  2. Many photographers are against having to learn new skillsets just to remain competitive in a profession with diminishing returns.  Many were ripped off by debt-creating educational institutions, and to protect the "value" of their malinvestement, they must believe everything they were told/taught, while never seeking anything beyond their religions.  And thus when thrown a life-presever of shooting video at the same time as stills, they push it away, instead calling the waahhahambulance, begging the admins to censor and delete all novel methods of shooting stills & video at the same time. 
  3. 'Tis often human/fanboy nature to fear and avoid the new and different, while staying in yesteryear's comfort zone, even though the waves of technological innovation are filling that comfort zone with water.  Machiavelli stated thusly, ``It must be considered that there is nothing more difficult to carry out, nor more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to handle, than to initiate a new order of things.  For the reformer has enemies in all those who profit by the old order, and only lukewarm defenders in all those who would profit by the new order, this lukewarmness arising partly from fear of their adversaries, who have the laws in their favour; and partly from the incredulity of mankind, who do not truly believe in anything new until they have had the actual experience of it.''
  4. 'Tis often "fanboy expert" nature to stand on the shore and yell at the waves to stop, instead of learning how to surf them.  The fanbabies will band together in mobs and seek to legislate against all the fun the surfers are having, especially when the fanbaby experts have sizable twitter followings! Surely, due to the size of their twitter followings, if anything was worth inventing, they would have invented it!  The "not invented here" mentality takes over, as after all, they invented the flash and the strobe! (actually they didn't, but that doesn't matter to them as they own twitter or something).
  5. 'Tis the nature of the web 2.0 that many fanboyz consider themselves "kings of the hill" in forums invested heavily in yesteryear's technologies, and thus any useful innovation which they personally do not like is considered spam, as they lead their loyal groupthink mob in railing against novel, useful inventions as well as the future, going "lzozzlolzo we rok u suck lzozlzoz bnanned from our twitter 4ever lzozlzl all your 9shooter are belong 2 us pwn3d lzozlz."  The great Jaron Lanier wrote a whole book on this--You are Not a Gadget.
But nevertheless, when someone as prominent as the NYT shoots stills and video at the same time (even in a manner inferior to the 9shooter, which we considered a couple years back) they are praised as geniuses and bold innovators, for doing something which was innovative a couple years ago (a century ago in internet time!), way back when it was first introduced, only to be ridiculed and violently opposed by the usual suspects--by a handful of domineering (and in reality quite timid) forum fanboyz.  Come tomorrow, the timid fanboyz will tweet their praise of the concept of shooting stills & video @ the same time as they become the "Early Majority," as soon as they sense it is safe to walk down the road, after the "Innovators" and "Early Adopters" did all the work in clearing the way. :) And no doubt about it, the "Early Majority," who just yesterday snarked, castigated, and belittled the concept, will take great pride in tweeting to the "Late Majority" the proper and correct methods for 9shooting.  :)
"All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." -Shopenhauer on the truth & beauty of shooting stills & video at the same time! :)
Now that we have crossed the chasm from fanbaby experts tweeting, "lzozlolzzo that braket sux u cant shoot stills & vid at the same time choose one or other duh lzoozzl omg bikinis lzozo yah ayah," to fanboy photographers posting, "lzoozlzoz must ban all talk and censor all posts of shooting stills video smae time lzozozlo omg bikinis lzozozo," we are now ready for shooting stills & video @ the same time to become a self-evident truth.  And the 9shooter happens to offer the superior method. :)

Rock on dudes & dudettes & have fun! lzozlolzoz

Top 10 reasons why the 9shooter bracket (Canon 5D Mark II DSLR + Camcorder/Video Camera) beats the NYT's Doug Mills' method for shooting photographic stills and video simultaneously.






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